Completed Testament Area

 

Exposition of the Divine Principle is the new authorized English translation of Wolli Kangron. The first English translation, The Divine Principle, was made in 1973 by Dr. Won Pok Choi. Dr. Choi labored with considerable erudition to select the proper terminology and convey the complex thought of this text. Aware of its sacred nature, she made a point of producing a literal translation. Through this work, she laid the foundation for the teaching of the Divine Principle in the Western world. In recognition of Dr. Choi’s pioneering work, when Reverend Moon commissioned this new translation he requested that the translators seek out her advice. She gave constructive guidance and played an active role in improving the translation. In a real sense, her hands have guided this project.

For this version, the translators have sought, above all, to accurately render the meaning of the Korean text into clear English. The style of the Korean text, in keeping  with the most erudite efforts of that generation, employs long and complicated  sentences with numerous embedded clauses expressing complex relationships. It is simply not possible to express every nuance in the compact, linear structure of modern English. Whereas modern English wants to pin down every thought in an  unequivocal proposition, the Korean of that time often renders thought loosely and dynamically, utilizing metaphor and context to convey meaning. Wherever a literal translation would not adequately express the thought and argumentation of the text, we have rearranged the order of thought in a manner more suitable to the Western mind. At times we used creative phraseology rather than dictionary definitions to evoke comparable understandings, feelings and cultural associations. Furthermore, the Divine Principle employs some technical terminology and gives distinctive meanings to certain common words. Wherever possible, for this translation, we drew from common English vocabulary rather than invent new theological terms. Hence, ordinary words may be invested with distinctive meanings, for example: “indemnity,” “condition” and “foundation.” Proper understanding requires attention to their particular usage in the text.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PDF file: Divine Principle

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